Sustainability

Sustainability on the Post

As part of Twentieth Century Fox’s commitment to environmental sustainability in its film productions, the studio recently led efforts to green the set of The Post, Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award-nominated drama starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks about The Washington Post’s role in publishing the Pentagon Papers in 1971. The filming process lasted 52 days and took the cast and crew across dozens of locations in New York and Washington, D.C., with each new site presenting its own unique sustainability challenges. However, the combined efforts of the cast and crew allowed the movie to save 32.5 metric tons of carbon emissions, divert 80% of its waste from landfill, and donate more than 2,600 meals to those in need.

The studio’s standard practice is to encourage sustainability on the set of every new film in its production slate, mandating the use of lumber certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, establishing infrastructure for recycling and composting set materials, and helping crews find access to renewable energy sources. On The Post, Fox hired Emellie O’Brien of Earth Angel to help expand these efforts and supervise daily progress. She worked with every department to set goals and track data, as well as develop new strategies to recycle specialty items such as film stock and camera batteries. She also led the Green Crew Member of the Week program, recognizing those who went above and beyond in their sustainability efforts.

The crew on The Post also devoted its time and energy toward benefiting the communities where they worked. They partnered with the nonprofit Rock & Wrap It Up to donate 3,130 pounds of leftover food to New York area homeless shelters and food banks, amounting to 2,607 meals. The production office also donated more than 8,100 pounds of clothing, furniture, and other household objects to more than a dozen other charities.

The environmental initiative drew on best practices from the Green Production Guide, with Fox developed in collaboration with the Producers Guild of America and other major movie studios, and built on the long history of sustainable production at 21st Century Fox.The company regularly works with production crews across its film and television projects to integrate environmental responsibility into their daily operations, including during the recent eleventh season of The X-Files.

Lean more about environmental sustainability on The Post by reading our in-depth case study. The Post is available for digital download and on Blu-ray and DVD. Watch the trailer below:


One Strange Rock Science Education

On the eve of the premiere of One Strange Rock, the thrilling 10-part documentary series exploring the conditions that create life on Earth, 21st Century Fox’s National Geographic has launched a suite of educational tools designed to bring to life some of the series’ key scientific lessons. The resources are available completely free for educators and include activities for students of all ages, including interactive online games and maps, photography, videos, slideshows, worksheets, articles, and a curriculum guide developed in collaboration with the nonprofit Journeys in Film. One Strange Rock premieres on Monday, March 26, at 10/9c on National Geographic.

One Strange Rock was filmed in 45 countries on six continents and from space, and features insights from some of the world’s most accomplished astronauts. The series is hosted by Will Smith and presented by visionary director Darren Aronofsky, who spoke about the series’ potential as an educational tool at a Television Critics Association panel in January: “What was exciting about this was taking astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, and physics, and trying to sort of blend them together to talk about this home that we’re all living on.”

The educational materials reflect this broad engagement with many different scientific fields, including articles on climate change, videos on plate tectonics, and an elementary school guide to extreme weather. The curriculum guide for middle and high school students works hand-in-hand with the series to spark discussions about the solar system, microscopic organisms, the history of the space program, and more. Journeys in Film previously partnered with 21CF for curriculum guides tied to Hidden Figures, Mars, and He Named Me Malala.

Explore more educational activities for One Strange Rock, and watch the trailer for the series below:


Green Production on The X-Files

Nearly twenty-five years after The X-Files first premiered on FOX in 1993, the show returned for an eleventh season earlier this year, not only reuniting David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson as FBI Agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully but also building on the series’ long history of going green behind the scenes. Fans can now check out an exclusive video and case study detailing how the cast and crew conserved energy, reduced waste, and made a difference in the communities where they filmed. The initiatives came as part of 21st Century Fox’s broad commitment to minimizing its environmental impacts, growing sustainably, and inspiring others to take action.

The X-Files is at the forefront of sustainable production, something of which I’m very proud,” series creator Chris Carter said during his acceptance speech for the Industry Builder Award at the 2016 Vancouver International Film Festival. “Every choice we make is an energy choice, whether it’s using biofuels in our generators or simply turning off our vehicles if we stop to talk on the phone. This takes such a combined effort by so many people from the bottom to the top, and it can only be done through a spirit of cooperation, sharing and mindfulness.”

For Season 11, Fox brought on green production specialists from Green Spark Group to work directly with each department over the course of the four-month shoot in British Columbia, Canada, to identify ways to conserve energy and reduce waste.

As a result, The X-Files diverted 68% of its waste from landfill, avoided 19 metric tons of carbon emissions, and saved nearly $150,000 in the process. The production also introduced a new food donation program that distributed more than 2,500 meals to those in need in the Vancouver area, and has already encouraged other film and TV projects in the region to adopt similar programs.

These achievements build on a long history of pioneering green production practices at 21CF. The company regularly works with production crews across its film and television projects to ensure environmental responsibility is integrated into each department’s daily operations, including large-scale efforts on the Fox Studios Lot and the testing of new technologies such as the mobile power generators piloted during the production of FX’s Legion.

Learn more about environmental sustainability on The X-Files by reading our detailed case study and watching the exclusive video below:


National Geographic 'Evening of Exploration' Gala

National Geographic recently hosted an “Evening of Exploration” at the Natural History Museum in London, the biggest event the organization has ever held in Europe. The gala was an opportunity to celebrate National Geographic’s 130 years of groundbreaking storytelling with National Geographic Explorers, National Geographic leaders, and luminaries from across Europe and Africa.

“Understanding and informing our world has been at the heart of National Geographic since our founding in 1888 when 33 of Washington, D.C.’s, top scientific and intellectual leaders — many the millennials of their time — joined forces to increase and diffuse geographic knowledge,” said Gary Knell, President and CEO of the National Geographic Society, in his opening remarks. He recounted National Geographic’s history of focusing on exploring, educating and inspiring, in addition to funding many explorers and advocates.

“Today we continue to support scientists, explorers and storytellers all over the globe, and we work each and every day to shine a spotlight on the challenges facing our planet using the global presence of our media megaphone to tell the stories of the courageous men and women trying to protect our natural world,” Gary added. National Geographic has funded hundreds of explorers across Europe and Africa and continues to look for opportunities to invest in new explorers and grantees in the region.

Dr. Enric Sala, National Geographic Explorer in Residence; Adjany Costa, National Geographic Emerging Explorer; and Charlie Hamilton James, one of National Geographic’s most prominent photographers, spoke about the importance of pushing toward a healthier and more sustainable future. Dr. Jane Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U.N. Messenger of Peace, was the keynote speaker for the evening.

The gala dinner was co-hosted by physicist and National Geographic Magazine Guest Editor Dr. Brian Cox, and actress and campaigner Joanna Lumley. Guests from National Geographic included Gary Knell, CEO of the National Geographic Society; Declan Moore, CEO of National Geographic Partners; Jan Koeppen, President of Fox Networks Group, Europe & Africa; and Jonathan Baillie, Chief Scientist and SVP of Global Grants, along with senior platform, brand and institutional partners from across Europe & Africa.

Other guests included actress, environmentalist and fellow National Geographic Magazine Guest Editor for 2018 Lily Cole; actress, producer and National Geographic Magazine Guest Editor for 2018 Archie Panjabi; director of the Tate and National Geographic Guest Editor for 2018 Dr. Maria Balshaw; Brett Morgen, director of “Jane”; and Bryan Burk, producer of “Jane”; Sarah Sands, Editor of “The Today Programme” on BBC Radio 4; Tina Daheley, journalist and presenter for the BBC; Jo Coburn, senior broadcast journalist and host of BBC News Channel’s “The Daily Politics” show; Siobhan Kennedy, Business Editor for Channel 4 News; Christiane Amanpour, Chief International Correspondent for CNN; John Ryley, Head of Sky News; Ian King, Business Correspondent for Sky News; and theater producer Sally Greene.

National Geographic Partners returns 27 percent of its proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in science, exploration, conservation and education. The Society now has an endowment of $1.2 billion, and in 2017 it funded more than 600 grants to cover the fields of education, technology, journalism, photography and mapping.

“We have the people, the tenacity, and the organization to push forward, to advance the world’s science and research, to tell stories that build awareness and spur action, to educate and to inspire change,” Gary told the evening’s guests. If we work together we can and we will achieve our ultimate goal: a planet in balance.”


ACS: Gianni Versace Set Donations

Twentieth Century Fox Television and the production crew of FX Networks’ American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace have made donations of nearly $15,000 worth of furniture, artwork, lights and more materials used on set to the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles. The organization helps provide home improvement materials to families in need, and TCFTV provided an entire warehouse worth of items at entirely no cost. 21st Century Fox’s film and television productions regularly find new homes for leftover set materials in order to both reduce waste and support the communities where these projects work and film.

“After American Crime Story: Versace wrapped this season, our team had to find a home for many of the gently-used set pieces,” said Lisa Day, who oversees environmental sustainability efforts across Twentieth Century Fox. “Fox is dedicated to keeping as many reusable items out of the landfill as possible, so we decided to donate much of it to Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles ReStores. It’s reassuring to know these set pieces will be given a second life and support a great cause.”

ReStores are nonprofit home improvement centers operated by Habitat LA that sell new and lightly used furniture, appliances, home accessories, building materials, and more at a fraction of the standard retail price. Fox donation included scores of items, including living room furniture, outdoor patio furniture, desks, dining room tables, kitchen appliances, curtains, glassware, bookcases, coffee tables, bedroom furniture, chandeliers, floor lamps, wall lamps, mirrors, TV mounts, barstools, and more, with many items featuring designs that mimic Gianni Versace’s trademark style.

TCFTV donated additional set materials to The Actors Gang, a 35 year-old theater company based in Los Angeles.

Learn more about Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles ReStores and check out the slideshow below of some of the donated items: